Thursday, December 9, 2010

Christmas Markets...

OK - so by now, you've probably made it to at least one... but ever find yourself wondering if there's some special little town, without all the crowds, but beautiful in it's magical setting?  Or maybe you'd like to find a way to go to a Christmas market in a town you haven't yet explored, but don't know which towns have them?

Well here's a tip on a lesser known, but fabulous market close by, AND a great list of Christmas markets - in English!

The Christmas Market list can be found here - http://www.cometogermany.com/ENU/culture_and_events/christmas_markets.htm
 which seems to be a great English resource for all sorts of things about Germany, not just Christmas markets!  The list of towns is on the lower left hand side of the article.

And the suggested market is Bad Wimpfen.  It's about 2 hours from here, so definitely not around the corner, but is supposed to be absolutely magical, and a bit more off the beaten path than Nürnberg or Rothenberg.  It is one of the oldest markets in Germany, and is located in the town's old medieval center, nestled under the "Blaue Turm" one of the old medieval towers.

An excerpt from their website -
 "Different to many other big cities, where Christmas markets have developed into types of annual markets, Wimpfen offers here arts and crafts articles, complimenting the idea of Christmas gift shopping.


Something else differs Wimpfen from other Christmas Markets, it is a festival for children.

The „ Christkind “ (Christchild) and St. Nikolaus (Father Christmas), accompanied by medieval foot soldiers, hand out little presents to the children. Two roundabouts near the „ Blaue Turm “ and the „ Loewenbrunnen “ (Lions Fountain) are awaiting the children.

In the „ Fairy Tales Tower “ , the story of the „ Tales of the 4 Seasons “ will be told to the little visitors. On all Saturdays and Sundays there will be puppetshows in the „ Zehentscheue r“ (Tenth Giving Barn), where the medieval villagers of Wimpfen were compelled to give 10 percent of their harvest to the church. This barn was to store the crop given."



 

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